Design

A New Breed of Magazine

For many of us, reading about wine can seem daunting. We are familiar with a brand of wine journalism that focuses more on the details of a particular wine than it does on the context in which we are drinking it. But with the help of a new breed of wine and drinks publications, wine journalism is starting to evolve into something that sits more naturally alongside our other lifestyle choices, encouraging us to offer it the same consideration that we would the food that we eat or the clothes that we wear. We’ve chosen four publications that caught our attention with their visual matter and thoughtful narrative on a topic that struggles to capture a younger audience around it.

Alquimie_Magazine

Alquimie

Alquimie is a drinks publication founded by editor Josh Alias and creative director Nicholas Cary in Australia. They ruminate on all manner of drinks, from wine and spirits to coffee and even water. From the gold foiling on the front cover, to the clean minimalist photography and considered tone of voice, Josh and Nicholas have skilfully pushed wine and drinks into a non traditional environment.

www.alquimie.com.au

Noble_Rot_Magazine

Noble Rot

Noble Rot is a food and wine magazine founded by Mark Andrew and Dan Keeling in London. Aesthetically it feels more like a grown up zine, using playful illustration to create a fun, open environment in which people can read and learn about wine. You’ll find interviews with musicians such James Murphy and Brian Eno to chefs and prolific wine writers such as Jamie Goode.

Mark and Dan also have their own restaurant and wine bar that goes by the same name on Lambs Conduit Street in Holborn, London.

www.noblerot.co.uk

TONG_Magazine

Tong

Where Alquimie and Noble Rot are more visual, Tong is all about smart, detail orientated commentary on wine. Each journal explores one topic, either a grape variety (for example Nebbiolo), wine style (Champagne) or influence (Oak). The design is simple, but beautiful, using only one colour and two fonts throughout each issue. It drills down into the minute details, carrying with it a lot of wine terminology that will delight those that have an existing interest and knowledge of wine.

www.tongmagazinedigital.com

TheArtofEating_Magazine

The Artful Eater

The Artful Eater is one man’s personal commentary on food and wine. Edward Behr, an American writer, is somewhat an authority on food and has also written several books, including the brilliant Art of Eating. Much like in his books, Behr crafts traditional prose about food and wine related topics in an honest, candid and non-trend related way.

www.artofeating.com

 

Spanish Design for Food & Wine

Spain’s culinary prowess is no secret. Both El Bulli and El Celler De Can Roca have occupied the prestigious number one spot in the World’s 50 best restaurants, with the likes of Mugaritz and Asador Etxebarri hot on their heels. Their ability to combine flavour, spectacle and design without losing sight of their traditional roots has helped to raise awareness of Spain as a culinary melting pot.

OTTO, by designer Ramirez i Carillo uses computer – generated geometry to create this modular wine rack.

OTTO, by designer Ramirez i Carillo uses computer – generated geometry to create this modular wine rack.

As a celebration of Spain’s contribution to contemporary food design, the Acción Cultural Española (AC/E) have commissioned a roving exhibition, TAPAS: Spanish Design for Food, showcasing over 200 objects that explore the relationship between food, design and science and how they’ve influenced eating habits and the cultural landscape of Spain.

Marti Guixe’s project, Embedded Drinks, infuses edible snacks with alcohol, harking back to an old Catalonian tradition that soaked bread in wine and sugar.

Marti Guixe’s project, Embedded Drinks, infuses edible snacks with alcohol, harking back to an old Catalonian tradition that soaked bread in wine and sugar.

Divided into four sections – Kitchen, Table, Food & Wine – the exhibition explores the evolution of traditional objects such as the Paella pan and the Porrón (a wine pitcher) alongside contemporary tools that have been designed for Ferran Adrià’s creations. It also delves into the impact leading food designers have had on food culture in Spain and the architecture of some of Spain's most celebrated wineries.  

Qumran is a winery in Castilla y León designed by architects Sandra Hernández + Álvaro Solís to work with the natural environment and different elevations found in the vineyard.

Qumran is a winery in Castilla y León designed by architects Sandra Hernández + Álvaro Solís to work with the natural environment and different elevations found in the vineyard.

The exhibit has toured major cities in America such as Washington and Miami, as well as cropping up in Tokyo, Korea and Toronto. To see all of the designs download the accompanying ebook to the exhibition here in Spanish and English.

 

Sissel Tolaas & The Art of Smell

It’s a little mind-boggling to think about where Sissel Tolaas’s nose has been. A ‘scent artist’, Tolaas has multiple degrees in chemistry, languages and art, and works with brands, such as Comme des Garçons, adidas and Ikea to develop conceptual scents. Her laboratory shelves are teaming with thousands of smells that she has tirelessly captured over the years, from smelly socks, to toys, rotting food and exotic flowers.

Tolaas captured the scent of nine men prone to panic attacks for her exhibition FEAR at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center in New York.

Tolaas captured the scent of nine men prone to panic attacks for her exhibition FEAR at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center in New York.

But where Tolaas really comes to life is with her personal projects, which blur the boundaries between art and science and challenge our understanding of this seemingly undervalued sense. At her 2006 exhibit at MIT, ‘the FEAR of smell – the smell of FEAR’, Tolaas captured and revealed the scent of men who were prone to severe anxiety attacks via scratch and sniff panels, whilst her piece at SFMOMA’s ‘How Wine Became Modern’ exhibition in 2010 attempted to replicate the smell of a rare 100-point Robert Parker rated wine on the artist's breath.

Tolaas recreated the smell of a ‘perfect’ 100 point wine as rated by wine critic Robert Parker at SFMOMA's 'How Wine Became Modern'

Tolaas recreated the smell of a ‘perfect’ 100 point wine as rated by wine critic Robert Parker at SFMOMA's 'How Wine Became Modern'

Considering we breath in around 27,000 times a day, we have little understanding about the role that scent plays in our everyday life, let alone the language at our fingertips to describe it. Tolaas’s work strives to help us do this, firstly by getting us to pay attention to the world and scents around us and secondly by creating experience’s that allow us to talk about smell in a more tangible way.

See her in action here, where she talks about the relationship between smell and memory as part of the Serpentine’s Memory Marathon in 2012 .